Annette Andrews, Lloyd's of London

Annette Andrews, Lloyd's of London

I have lived and worked all over the world.  I only came to live in the UK in my early teens – going to a boys boarding school near Cambridge.  I was one first girls to go into the school.  I was different as I had moved from Jamaica – I had a Jamaican accent, never worn a school uniform let alone shoes and I had been home schooled before I arrived in the UK.

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Abigail Ball, QBE Insurance

Abigail Ball, QBE Insurance

I have family members and many friends who are part of the LGBT community and from a very early age I have heard many different stories, and experiences that people have had when coming out or being around people who are not tolerant and to me it has never entered my head that anyone should be treated differently just because of who they are. When I had the chance to be involved with Pride I jumped at it as I knew how passionately I felt about making a difference and now was the chance to do so.

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Sarah Booth, Beazley

Sarah Booth, Beazley

I joined our diversity and inclusion steer co 18 months ago.  It became very obvious to me at this point **cliché alert** that I had to be the change I wanted to see.  We all have a part to play in inclusion.  I think it’s easy to assume that someone else is taking care of it.…that it should sit with HR or the leadership team and those were my thoughts until I got my position on that committee.  But actually we are ALL responsible and that makes us all role models.  We all need to display good behaviours in order to continue to drive an inclusive culture.

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Yvonne Braun, Association of British Insurers (ABI)

Yvonne Braun, Association of British Insurers (ABI)

In my own career, my experience has been that you need to change the environment yourself, leading by example. But you also should do what you can for those coming after you.

As a member of the ABI’s five-person executive team, I am in the position to shape our culture to make sure that our environment is welcoming to all, and as a representative organisation, we can help set the tone for our sector.

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Joe Clayton, Hiscox

Joe Clayton, Hiscox

Do whatever makes you comfortable. Personally I feel uncomfortable trying to avoid talking about my life outside at work so an initial uncomfortable conversation (which probably is only uncomfortable for you!) means a more enjoyable experience at work. Don’t force yourself or let others push for you to do anything, do whatever you feel in yourself is what will make you most comfortable and therefore allow you to perform at your best.

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